Tropical storms - Revision 3 - GCSE Geography - BBC Bitesize

 

hurricane katrina 2005 case study

Hurricane Katrina Case Study. Hurricane Katrina was a powerful and deadly storm. Katrina is the costliest storm and the third deadliest storm in U.S. history. Based on the size of the area impacted and the number of people affected, Katrina was one of the largest natural disasters in the history of the United States. The effects of Katrina on. Katrina then strengthened from category 1 to category 5 intensity with winds of mph in less than 48 hours (“Hurricane Katrina”). Despite this strengthening, people in New Orleans were still not worried because the storm was expected to hit the Florida Panhandle (“Surviving Katrina”). Aug 25,  · Hurricane Katrina Case Study. Hurricane Katrina is tied with Hurricane Harvey () as the costliest Hurricane on record. Although not the strongest in recorded history, the hurricane caused an estimated $ billion worth of damage. The category five hurricane is the joint eight strongest ever recorded, with sustained winds of mph ( km/h).


Hurricane Katrina | Case Study Template


Arriving in late August with winds of up to mph, the storm caused widespread flooding. Flooding Hurricanes can cause the sea level around them to rise, this effect is called a storm surge. This is often the most dangerous characteristic of a hurricane, and causes the most hurricane-related deaths.

It is especially dangerous in low-lying areas close to the coast. There is more about hurricanes in the weather section of the Met Office website www. Hurricane Katrina tracked over the Gulf of Mexico and hit New Orleans, a coastal city with huge areas below sea-level which were protected by defence walls, called levees.

The levees were overwhelmed by the extra water, hurricane katrina 2005 case study, with many collapsing completely. Strong winds The strongest winds during August were over the coastal areas of Louisiana and Florida. A map of the maximum wind speeds which were recorded during the Hurricane Katrina episode is shown. Although the winds did not directly kill many people, it did produce a storm surge over the ocean which led to flooding in coastal areas and was responsible for many deaths.

Hurricane Katrina animated satellite image. Tornadoes Hurricanes can create tornadoes. Thirty-three tornadoes were produced by Hurricane Katrina over a five-day period, although only one person died due to a tornado which affected Georgia. The broken levees were repaired by engineers and the flood water in the streets of New Orleans took several months to drain away. The broken levees and consequent flooding were largely responsible for most of the deaths in New Orleans. One of the first challenges in the aftermath of the flooding was to repair the broken levees.

Vast quantities of materials, such as sandbags, were airlifted in by the army and air force and the levees were hurricane katrina 2005 case study repaired and strengthened. Although the USA is one of the wealthiest developed countries in the world, it highlighted that when a disaster is large enough, even very developed countries struggle to cope. Web page reproduced with the kind permission of the Met Office. Physical impacts of Hurricane Katrina Aftermath Physical impacts of Hurricane Katrina Flooding Hurricanes can cause the sea level around them to rise, this effect is called a storm surge.

Hurricane Katrina also produced a lot of rainfall, which also contributed to the flooding. In pictures House and car destroyed by the hurricane Flooded New Orleans street Boat on top of a house Strong winds The strongest winds during August were over the coastal areas of Louisiana and Hurricane katrina 2005 case study. Satellite Image Fig.

Hurricane Katrina animated satellite image Illustration Fig 2. Illustration showing different wave heights on a shoreline. Image courtesy of NOAA. Impact on humans 1, deaths in the states of Louisiana, Mississippi and Florida. Thousands of homes and businesses destroyed. Criminal gangs roamed the streets, looting homes and businesses and committing other crimes. Thousands of jobs lost and millions of dollars in lost tax incomes. Agricultural production was damaged by tornadoes and flooding.

Cotton and sugar-cane crops were flattened. Three million people were left without electricity for over a week. Tourism centres were badly affected. A significant part of the USA oil refining capacity was disrupted after the storm due to flooded refineries and broken pipelines, and several oil rigs in the Gulf were damaged, hurricane katrina 2005 case study. Major highways were disrupted and some major road bridges were destroyed.

Many people have moved to live in hurricane katrina 2005 case study parts of the USA and many may never return to their original homes. Aftermath The broken levees were repaired by engineers and the flood water in the streets of New Orleans took several months to drain away.

Weather Map Fig 3, hurricane katrina 2005 case study. Map of America showing highest wind speeds.

 

Hurricanes: Science and Society: Hurricane Katrina Case Study

 

hurricane katrina 2005 case study

 

Start studying Case Study - Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans". Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools. Case study: Hurricane Katrina, Path of hurricane Katrina Impacts. Katrina was a category 4 storm. Storm surges reached over 6 metres in height. Katrina then strengthened from category 1 to category 5 intensity with winds of mph in less than 48 hours (“Hurricane Katrina”). Despite this strengthening, people in New Orleans were still not worried because the storm was expected to hit the Florida Panhandle (“Surviving Katrina”).